Thursday, 16 July 2009

Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet

Just as I post a video a new and updated one pops up. Oh guess what, everyone is raving about it. It does look really cool though, even though that art-style has been done quite a few times before. Horrendous choice for the soundtrack though.

heavy metal anything = awful music and not cool whatsoever...

remember kids, as Ayn Rand would say, the only thing worse than a conformist is a fashionable non-conformist...

3 comments:

tutorphil said...

Ayn Rand?! She of 'The Fountainhead'? Your breadth and depth is always a joy, Mr Beg! So what exactly is your educational history... methinks you've had some good teachers in your time, am I right?

Tom Beg said...

Not really, I just had a typical Primary and Secondary school education where I neither excelled or failed. I didn't do A-levels, I left school at 16 for the UCA in Maidstone and have never looked back... I think I would asphyxiated myself with my own school-tie if i'd stayed on at school for another two years...

Fortunately the teachers at college were all good folks, one of whom being Lucy Panesar who I guess you probably know?

tutorphil said...

Yes - Lucy is great; I do a spot of lecturing for her now and then; so, you don't come from an academic background, and yet it does seem as if you have an academic bent - certainly a critical one; you're very clear about your likes and dislikes - remakes get your scorn by the sackload; personally, I always find remakes interesting (not because I have any expectations of them in terms of 'culture'), but rather because remakes can reflect the socio-cultural-economic conditions surrounding them at the time of their production, and comparisons between the original and the remakes can shed light on cultural shifts: there are a few remakes that also succeed on their own merit: i'd suggest the 1970's remake of Invasion of the Body-Snatchers is excellent, as if the Abel Fererra version that followed it; also the remake of Night of the Living Dead (by Tom Savini) is suprisingly good; the recent trend for re-booting franchises (particularly horror franchises) do seem to prove the idea that Hollywood is all about the 'product' and adding value to 'old-stock', but some directors work from a place of love - for instance J.J.Abrams and Star Trek; yes, the studios needed it for business reasons, but Abrams signed on to the project because of love; it's like anything else, an artist can transcend the strictures of their sponsorship; most adverts are, in artistic terms, far more interesting than the product they purport to profile; of course, the most interesting remake is Gus Van Sant's shot-for-shot remake of Psycho - but I'll be talking about that next term... :-)